Happy 4th Birthday to Faithless Elector!

FE-birthday

March 14, 2016

Four years ago today, I received the final proof copy of Faithless Elector from the printer. Thank you to everyone who has supported and taken part in a thrilling journey!

It’s one that continues with Dark Network, and the soon-to-be published EMERGENCY POWERS (Oct. 1), which will finish the series. Though focused on Imogen Trager’s struggles, the books have a ripped-from-the-headlines feel: a jaded, cynical electorate, a fractious FBI, an undermined Attorney General, powerful people exploiting the rule of law for their own gain. (There’s even a prison murder made to look like a suicide.) But the books are more than headlines about things people think they know. And darker.

They are tense, #NoirPolitik thrillers about corruption, murder and ultimately a kind of redemption, achieved at enormous personal cost for the feisty heroine, FBI Agent Imogen Trager and those around her.

Back in those seemingly innocent Spring days of early 2016, no one could be sure who the candidates would be. I made a conscious choice to use fictional candidates. While I hoped the book’s topicality in the run-up to the election would help it stand apart from the hundreds of other political thrillers out there (it did!), I didn’t want it to be a broadside–about one real party or candidate trying to steal the election.

It was important that readers see the larger themes of power politics and not automatically view the events through the divisive prism of the primaries. The story would suffer under the weight of pre-existing views. I wanted the book to express a broader dilemma about the real-world consequences of democratic deficiency. I’m gratified that readers have seemed to embrace this part of the book. The story appeals to conservatives and liberals alike because it’s about all of us.

The key to Faithless Elector was that in a close Electoral College race, it would not take much to tip the scales. A disciplined, well-funded group could undermine and hijack the parties–and the will of the people. It was a danger then, and the danger remains potent now. Moreover, the novel’s plot hinges on the actions of ordinary citizens thrust into extraordinary circumstances, forced to act, forced to risk everything for their belief in democracy.

Since its publication on March 23, 2016, Faithless Elector has found a readership, for which I am deeply grateful. I’ve had correspondence from all over the US, the UK and Australia. Most of it has been very positive (some of it alarmingly CAPS LOCK hostile, but those folks were never actual readers).

I’ve had two readers who reached out to me and identified themselves as real Electors. One, himself a professor, felt events in the book were a little too close for his comfort: he wrote to me that one night, he, like the fictional Professor Calder, was working late at the university. The sudden sounds of slamming doors and footsteps echoing through his building unnerved him. He decided to finish his work at home that night.

I have heard from other readers that the book has ruined parking garages for them. They can no longer view them as just ugly features on the landscape, but as fraught with danger. Graduate students and academics have told me they enjoyed the portrayals of Calder and Matthew and university life. I’ve loved meeting readers–in person and online–and I’ve had wonderful questions at the readings and book talks I’ve done, as well as passionate appeals to bring back certain relatively minor characters. (I’ll do what I can!)

Here’s to Imogen and Duncan, and as always, Matthew!

The Imogen Trager Thrillers at a glance:

trilogy-draft

Faithless ElectorEveryone thinks the election is over, but six weeks is a long time in politics. An idealistic, young researcher stumbles onto a plot to steal the presidency, with deadly consequences.

Dark Network Without law, there’s only power. FBI Agent Imogen Trager is alone and in grave danger from a conspiracy she failed to destroy. She’ll have to fight against time, a sinister network, and even her own colleagues to defeat it.

Emergency Powers (Oct. 1)No battle plan survives contact with the enemy. The investigation that was FBI Agent Imogen Trager’s undoing may be the key to stopping a brutal, false flag terrorist attack meant to tighten a puppet president’s grip on power.

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James McCrone is the author of the Imogen Trager political suspense-thrillers Faithless Elector and Dark Network about a stolen presidency, a conspiracy, and a nation on edge.  The third book, Emergency Powers, is coming October 1st, and he’s at work on a fourth book called Bastard Verdict (w/t) .

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Find them through Indybound.org.  They are also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Powell’s Books.

Link to REVIEWS

If you live in Philadelphia, you can pick up your copies at Head House Books -or- Penn Book Center or in Princeton at Cloak & Dagger Books.
For a full list of appearances and links to reviews, check out:  JamesMcCrone.com

A Split Ticket Presidential Bid

Joe Biden’s little remarked claim that he would consider a Republican running mate (CNN-12/30/2019) came and went during the Christmas-New Year week. This kind of Statesman seeming, half-measure is at the heart of the latest #NoirPolitik Imogen Trager thriller, EMERGENCY POWERS, due out October 1, 2020, and it sets in motion a series of disastrous events.Biden-Repub-runningmate-scrnshot

I expect that Biden was just hoping to generate some headlines during a slow news week, but a bipartisan ticket would probably only serve to dilute and confuse the issues facing the nation. Political party matters, particularly at the national level. Senators and Congress Reps vote with their party more than 90 percent of the time*.

FE3.Pawn-to-King.w copyDespite our claims as voters that we want our representatives to act independently, we would be aghast if a politician actually did vote that way. We certainly don’t. 90 to 95% of registered Democrats will vote for their party’s nominee*, as will the same number of registered Republican voters.

In the forthcoming Emergency Powers, as in Faithless Elector and Dark Network, there are forces at work outside of—and parasitic upon—the major parties. But they are effective (in the books, and some would say in real life) because these extra-party groups have captured the party’s leadership.

Though focused on Imogen’s struggles, and without being about current leadership, each book continues to have a ripped-from-the-headlines feel:  a fractious FBI, an undermined Attorney General, powerful people using all manner of treachery to maintain their hold on power—and to get more. And in Emergency Powers, the key to re-establishing faith in government and the rule of law was a Statesman-seeming compromise, a bipartisan ticket. But the conspirators aren’t satisfied. They’re avaricious and mean to control every lever of power.

Perhaps I shouldn’t say “ripped-from-the-headlines,” but anticipating them?

The Imogen Trager series demystifies the processes at work. The previous novels dealt with Faithless Electors as possibly corrupt actors in a presidential election (Faithless Elector in early 2016) and a factional FBI eating itself from within in Dark Network (2017). At the center of it all is the feisty Agent Imogen Trager, who will do battle with the conspirators, her own demons–and even her own colleagues.

What insights into real events will Emergency Powers bring?

 

In EMERGENCY POWERS (Oct. 2020) the investigation that was FBI Agent Imogen Trager’s undoing may be the key to stopping a brutal, false flag terrorist attack meant to tighten a puppet president’s grip on power.

Imogen is haunted—and sidelined—by a case she couldn’t solve. When the president dies in office, she knows that the conspiracy she chased down a blind alley still has life in it—and she needs to get back in the hunt. The new accidental president is no accident, and the old case may be the key to stopping a brutal, false flag terrorist attack meant to finalize the new puppet president’s grip on power. Imogen doesn’t know it yet, but she’s running out of time…

Emergency Powers goes on sale October 1st.

*I’m grateful to Nate Silver and the folks at the 538 blog, and to Ohio Northern University’s Prof. Robert Alexander for details on voting behavior.

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James McCrone is the author of the Imogen Trager political suspense-thrillers Faithless Elector and Dark Network , about a stolen presidency, a conspiracy, and a nation on edge.  The third book, Emergency Powers, is coming October 1st, and he’s at work on a fourth book called Bastard Verdict (w/t) .

JMc-author2.2017

Find them through Indybound.org.  They are also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Powell’s Books.

Link to REVIEWS

If you live in Philadelphia, you can pick up your copies at Head House Books -or- Penn Book Center or in Princeton at Cloak & Dagger Books.
For a full list of appearances and links to reviews, check out:

JamesMcCrone.com

 

Recurring Nightmares

Concerns and issues surrounding the Electoral College and Faithless Electors remain firmly in the spotlight with frightening implications. We’re still just over a year away from the 2020 election, and already alarm bells are sounding. The presidency remains frighteningly open to mischief and manipulation–perhaps more so than in March of 2016 when Faithless Elector debuted.

NYTimes.FaithlessOn October 14 the NY Times reported Faithless Electors’ Could Tip the 2020 Election: Will the Supreme Court Stop Them? At the story’s center, was a petition to the Supreme Court asking for a ruling as to whether so-called Faithless Electors were independent actors or whether the state laws requiring them to vote as pledged were constitutional. The petitioners noted that in the 2016 Presidential Election, there were seven (7!) such defections. Thus far in our history, no Faithless Elector(s) has ever changed what might be regarded as the result of a presidential election. But as the petition points out:

“A swing by that same number of electors [7] would have changed the results in five of fifty-eight prior presidential elections” [emphasis mine].

Cvr page-faithless-petitionTwo weeks later, Charles Lane, writing in the Washington Post, posited “A Nightmare Scenario for 2020: A Tie that Can’t be Broken.”  (It should be noted that Lane’s “scenario” ought to have come along with a royalty check to me–his opening paragraphs describe my first two thrillers, Faithless Elector and Dark Network very closely. 🙂 )

This past Friday (Nov. 1), Brookings described the problematic electoral college math in the impeachment proceedings thus far: The States that will Decide the 2020 Election Oppose Impeaching Trump. Once again, even though majorities favor the proceedings, the opinions of staunch Republican voters in the likely swing states of AZ, FLa, MI, NC, PA and WI oppose impeachment and removal by an average of 52%. While that could change as more comes out, it is well to note that electoral math is once again not on the side of the majority.

Brookings.FE.blog.pngWorse, as my thrillers point out, the Electoral College is ripe for mischief. A very close election, like the 2000 Bush-Gore election (where only 5 Electoral votes–271-266–separated the two candidates) could be disastrous for the nation. And, there was a Faithless Elector in that election, too–Barbara Lett-Simmons, a DC Elector–who did not cast her vote for Gore in protest of the District’s lack of representation in Congress. If four Electors had defected to Gore over the Florida recount debacle, he’d have won.

Screen Shot 2019-11-04 at 10.38.34 AMThe recent petition, probably with the 2000 election in mind–and the Bush v. Gore Supreme Court decision halting the Florida recount specifically–notes that: “the demographics of the United States indicate that contests will become even closer, [and] there is a significant probability that such swings could force this Court to resolve the question of electoral freedom within the context of an ongoing contest.”

That is to say, if the Supreme Court does not take the case or does not issue a ruling, we could  be arguing the validity of a result in the midst of the election.

It gets worse. A more perfect nightmare would be if in 2000 only 1 or 2 had defected, leaving neither candidate with a clear 270-vote majority. As is provided in the constitution, when there is no clear majority, Congress chooses the president–with each state delegation having only 1 vote.

A set of bad actors, who wanted to sow greater distrust in the voting process and undermine the integrity of the nation and its laws couldn’t dream of a better scenario– overturning a close election for their own purposes…leaving We the People entirely out of the process, and a nation lacking “the consent of the governed.”

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James McCrone is the author of the Imogen Trager political suspense-thrillers Faithless Elector and Dark Network , about a stolen presidency, a conspiracy, and a nation on edge.  The third book, Emergency Powers, is coming soon, and he’s at work on a fourth book called Bastard Verdict (w/t) .

JMc-author2.2017

Find them through Indybound.org.  They are also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Powell’s Books.

Link to REVIEWS

If you live in Philadelphia, pick up a copy at Head House Books -or- Penn Book Center or in Princeton at Cloak & Dagger Books.
For a full list of appearances and links to reviews, check out:

JamesMcCrone.com

 

 

 

Faithless Electors could have tipped 5 elections, and may tip the 2020 election

The New York Times published an article in their Sidebar section yesterday, “Faithless Electors Could Tip the 2020 Election: Will the Supreme Court Stop Them?” and it references the petition, a Writ of Certiorari to the Supreme Court, requesting a speedy review regarding the question of whether so-called Faithless Electors are independent actors or are bound to vote as pledged.

Cvr page-faithless-petitionThe petition points out that in the 2016 Presidential Election, there were seven (7!) such defections. Thus far in our history, no Faithless Elector(s) has ever changed what might be regarded as the result of a presidential election. But as the petition points out: 

“A swing by that same number of electors [7] would have changed the results in five of fifty-eight prior presidential elections” [emphasis mine].

It goes on to note:

“And as the demographics of the United States indicate that contests will become even closer, there is a significant probability that such swings could force this Court to resolve the question of electoral freedom within the context of an ongoing contest.”

Meaning that it would be best to decide the matter now ahead of the contest rather than in the heat of a presidential election, when it is bound to look partisan and thus illegitimate (Bush v. Gore anyone?).

I did not include the fact about Electors potentially overturning 5 elections in my thriller Faithless Elector (pub. March 2016) because it was published before the 2016 election and these 10 defections. Indeed, neither Trump nor Clinton appear in its pages. I wanted the novel to be free of partisanship. It’s a taut thriller with engaging, determined characters set a against a background that exposes the latent weaknesses and potential for mischief in the Electoral College system. The revelation that someone is trying to manipulate the Electoral vote and steal the presidency sets the characters on a dangerous path and pits them against deadly opposition. Based on the good reviews, as well as readers’ generous responses at book fairs and over social media, it seems I have achieved that goal.

Because while its setting is the 2016 election, the latent weaknesses remain in place, as the Writ of Certiorari/Petition makes clear. The petition, in fact, candidly states what I proposed (albeit fictionally) when I wrote Faithless: that in a close election, where only a few votes separate the two candidates, politics of a kind we would not regard as legitimate could determine the outcome.

 

James McCrone is the author of the Imogen Trager political suspense-thrillers Faithless Elector and Dark Network.  The third book, Emergency Powers, is coming soon, and he is at work on a fourth book called Bastard Verdict (w/t) .

JMc-author2.2017

Find them through Indybound.org.  They are also available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Powell’s Books.

Link to REVIEWS

If you live in Philadelphia, pick up a copy at Head House Books -or- Penn Book Center or in Princeton at Cloak & Dagger Books.
For a full list of appearances and links to reviews, check out:

JamesMcCrone.com